The economy of South Sudan is in crisis. Instability and the threat of violence loom. Meanwhile, the women of South Sudan are hoping for peace and working hard to transform their families’ lives. Meet three graduates of our South Sudan program who have become businesswomen, leaders, and role models. And find out how you can help more women, just like them, go “from zero” to a better life.

Married with six children.

WfWI program graduate.

Earns income by farming vegetables, working at the mill, selling tea, and loaning money with interest.

Share her video with your social networks:

Kana tells us she’s made many friends through our program, but she can’t have too many. Join Kana’s social network by sending a message of support to her and the other participants and graduates of the WfWI program.

The WfWI curriculum includes business training. This means that women in our program don’t just learn a trade, but they learn how to turn their trade into an income-generating business. They learn to buy, sell, serve customers, and manage their finances.

Kana tells us that, through the WfWI business training, she has learned the importance of bookkeeping. Now, when she farms, she counts and keeps track of her produce. This includes her bags of harvested groundnuts.

Groundnuts, or peanuts, are a staple of South Sudanese cuisine. Some women harvest and sell them on the local market. They are roasted and eaten whole, or ground into a popular paste much like peanut butter.

Married with seven children.

WfWI program graduate. Became a WfWI trainer.

Earns income farming and selling homemade donuts and bread.

Share her video with your social networks:

Hone your business skills and your baking talents by hosting a bake sale in honor of Rose.

Rose’s accomplishments and continuing hard work are even more impressive when taken in context.

The economy in South Sudan – a country just over two years old – is in economic crisis. Inflation has skyrocketed as the South Sudanese pound has depreciated.

The women we serve are among the poorest and most socially-excluded. The high price of goods means that our program participants and graduates struggle to afford the items afford they need to operate their small income generation activities. For the women we serve, earning an income right now is very difficult.

In addition to the economic troubles, South Sudan is facing a major humanitarian crisis. Parts of the country are plagued by widespread inter-communal violence, forcing thousands to be displaced from their homes.

Married with seven children.

WfWI program graduate.

Earns income by farming, selling tea, and loaning money with interest.

Elected leader of her business group.

Share her video with your social networks:

Host a dinner in honor of Helen and to help other women feed their families.

Helen tells us she was elected the leader of her business group (“cooperative”). This is a major accomplishment. Women in South Sudan do not often have the opportunity to assume leadership roles in any context.

For the women we serve, forming groups - or cooperatives - can be a great way to start earning and sustaining an income. The members pool their resources, share the work, and produce goods on a larger scale for greater profit.

As the leader of her group, Helen oversees their planning and finances, fosters collaboration, and represents the group locally.

Send a Message of Support to Kana

Join Kana’s social network by sending a message of support to her and the other participants and graduates of the WfWI program.

 
Close