Girls' education

One year after 276 girls were kidnapped from their school in Chibok, WfWI-Nigeria Country Director Ngozi Eze reflects on the current situation and what can be done.

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This week, people across Rwanda are coming together to remember the terrible genocide 21 years ago, and to stand together for the future of their country.

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From WfWI trainer to Provincial Council Member in Parwan, Afghanistan, Hosai Bayani’s unlikely journey demonstrates the impact women leaders are having on a changing country.

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Being able to earn an income and support herself and her children has changed the way Joyce views herself and her life. She has more self-confidence, and hope for the future. “I am now free from stress,” she says.

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Hassana has always been determined to see her own four children educated – especially her two daughters. However, Hassana found that paying their school fees to keep them in school was nearly impossible.

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Sara is a divorced single mother who has survived war and exile from her home country. She says she has been inspired by her trainers to keep working and striving.

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Before joining the WfWI training program in 2006, Huma didn’t get out much – she cared for her children, her home, and the cows that were the main source of income for her family.

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War has almost always been a part of Regina’s life. It forced her to drop out of school, led her to flee to the Democratic Republic of the Congo with her family, and even took the life of one of her eight children.

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Edita Veseli, a Life Skills manager for WfWI-Kosovo, shares the story of how women in the program inspire her and each other.

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Friba convinced her husband to continue his education by telling him she would refuse to marry him if he didn’t study. He is now a teacher.  

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