Graduate

They call themselves “Agaseke”. It’s because they had “a vision ahead of them,” they explain, as they sit together weaving baskets and making beads.

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This week, people across Rwanda are coming together to remember the terrible genocide 21 years ago, and to stand together for the future of their country.

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Hassana has always been determined to see her own four children educated – especially her two daughters. However, Hassana found that paying their school fees to keep them in school was nearly impossible.

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Before joining the WfWI training program in 2006, Huma didn’t get out much – she cared for her children, her home, and the cows that were the main source of income for her family.

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War has almost always been a part of Regina’s life. It forced her to drop out of school, led her to flee to the Democratic Republic of the Congo with her family, and even took the life of one of her eight children.

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For Phibi, a program graduate in Nigeria, a small savings bank made from mud clay represents the power she has to change her life – and the life of her daughter, too.

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When her husband died suddenly a few years ago, Roseline, age 50, knew she needed to find a way to support their eight children on her own.

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Zarghuna showing a garment made
in her factory in Kabul. 

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Breaking the cycle of violence isn’t easy. But by sharing and applying what she learned in the WfWI training program, Mary was able to put a stop to the violence in her home.

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When Christiana was unable to become pregnant and bear children, her husband became abusive. She found support in her network of friends in the WfWI training program.

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