Afghanistan is currently one of the most difficult countries in the world in which to identify as a woman. Political and economic insecurity, educational inequality, sexual violence, and poor health are pervasive amongst Afghan women and children, but when equipped with powerful vocational and economic tools, women can change their lives, regardless of circumstance.  

Since 2002, the Stronger Women, Stronger Nations program has reached more than 127,000 women in five provinces in Afghanistan. 

EMERGENCY: Violence is rising in Afghanistan and women are caught in the crossfire.

  • You can make an emergency contribution to help us reach as many women as possible in Afghanistan right now. DONATE NOW >>
  • You can add your name to our open letter, asking the Biden Administration to protect and support women. SIGN NOW >>
  • Learn more about our Afghanistan Response. READ MORE >>

About Our Afghanistan Program

Women for Women International has developed a program that offers Afghan women a constructive, dignified way to discover their power. Our foundational training helps women know and defend their rights, lead mentally and physically healthy lives, influence decisions at home and in their communities, generate income, and save money for the future, contributing to economic self-sufficiency in their lives and for their families. In a recent randomized control trial, our Stronger Women, Stronger Nations program in Afghanistan showed that there was a significant impact on women’s social and economic well-being a year after graduating from our program. Compared to women who did not participate, women in the program were nearly twice as likely to be earning money and seven times more likely to have savings. 

Women in the program also experienced: 

  • More equitable gender attitudes, 

  • Increased food security for their families, 

  • Increased freedom to travel, and 

  • More decision-making power in their households. 

An early adopter of our men’s engagement work, our Afghanistan team has reached almost 6,500 men since 2014.